My World in Words

PatrickCox kleinEarlier this year, I was interviewed in the comfort of my home by Patrick Cox (see photo), a British-American radio journalist who specialises in language. I’d enjoyed dozens of his World in Words shows as podcasts, partly because they are so interesting, partly because I like Patrick’s friendly and intelligent style and his pleasant voice (and trust me, I’m not saying this about all interviewers). World in Words is probably the language podcast that I like best, with Lexicon Valley an excellent second.

Yesterday, he sent me a note saying that the episode featuring me has been put online. Listening to myself talk is among my least favourite things (here’s why), but I think Patrick has managed to make me sound fairly coherent – there’s skill for you. Here‘s the link, and if you scroll down a bit, you’ll see the contents of the podcast listed: nearly 15 minutes of Dorren talking about multilingualism and me (well, he asked) and even singing a song. The other 15 minutes are about Klingon.

Enjoy, and do let me know what you think (but please, break it gently).

The language-eating giant and the 12 dwarfs

Britain is more multilingual than its image suggests, but at the same time too monolingual for its own good. What are its prospects?

ScotsWhat would have happened to ‘the Scots leid’ if the Yes side had won the referendum? It has been officially recognised as a language separate from English since 2001, when Britain ratified the Charter for Minority and Regional Languages. But would Scottish independence have changed the character of Scots? Could the language have become less, well – English?

That’s not as far-fetched as it may seem. Norwegian and Danish were once considered a single language, but two fairly different standard languages emerged after Norway’s breakaway in 1814. Bosnians spoke Serbo-Croatian before independence (1992), but Serbian, Croatian or Bosnian nowadays. There’s little to distinguish the three of them yet, but check back in a century. Continue reading

A hard-won flair

Me in Peru at the age of 22, busy learning Spanish

Me in Peru at the age of 22, busy learning Spanish

Several British journalists have asked with incredulity and a hint of admiration how come I ‘speak so many languages’. My standard response is embarrassment and stout denial.

Don’t think the denial is false modesty; it’s firmly grounded in fact. By sheer fluke, I grew up with two mother tongues, Dutch and Limburgish, the national and regional languages of my hometown. Studying English is compulsory in Dutch schools. Choosing German as a subject is wholly unremarkable, and the same with French. Since my school days, I’ve added only Spanish to the collection, severely damaging my French in the process. I don’t have the figures, but I’m pretty sure tens of thousands of Dutch people have a similar story. I’m just one of those who ‘speak a nice little word across the border’, the Dutch expression for being able to travel abroad and still talk to people. Continue reading